Foo Fighters’ Albums, Ranked From Worst to Best

Foo Fighters

The Foo Fighters, Dave Grohl’s solo studio project that quickly evolve into a full band, are now well on their way to becoming a “classic rock” band. More than two decades old and they’re still at it. For better or worse. They are like the granddaddies of corporate rock now—irrelevant and boring—in the same way Van Halen and Aerosmith were during the nineties. But that’s not to say the Foos never had excellent albums. They had a few. And before you start typing a hundred word vomit in defense of your favorite rock band, hear this: they’re my favorite band too. Or at least they used to be on my top five. Until they eventually slipped, around the time they released another album produced by Gil Norton, around the same time their concerts got bigger and bigger, while their songs started to sound more and more like lesser variations of their older hits.

One by One (2002)
The band’s least favorite album is also their worst. That makes sense. Over-produced, formulaic, and over-compressed—while arguably not their weakest set of songs—One by One is easily their worst sounding record. Tellingly, the best song from the album is the raw acoustic version of “Times Like These”, which can’t be found on the actual album.
Notable Tracks: All My Life, Have It All

Sonic Highways (2014)
You can resort to all sorts of gimmicks—TV documentaries, record your songs in different cities, invite your idols—or you can write your best damn songs and never worry much about the extraneous stuff. None of the eight tracks here are downright bad, none half-assed. If anything, they’re more likely to be full-assed or over-assed (i.e., one song features three guitarists plus the guy from Cheap Trick). But none of which are Continue reading “Foo Fighters’ Albums, Ranked From Worst to Best”

The Colour and the Shape (Foo Fighters, 1997)

PhotoGrid_1462693049920This is how rock music should be – loud guitars, propulsive drumming, plenty of hooks and catchy choruses. All these check boxes I’d like to tick – Foo Fighters’ The Colour and the Shape has them in spades. It has parts loud, abrasive, and unruly – ruckus intertwined with melody – and parts quiet and tender. There’s the post-breakup catharsis of “Monkey Wrench”, angry rant on “Wind Up”, the inspirational “My Hero”, pogo starter “Enough Space” and the loud-quiet-loud staple, “Hey, Johnny Park!”, which would have been a classic by now, had it been released as a single in ‘97. For the quiet and tender, there’s the ultra-mushy “Everlong”, the first half of “Up In Arms”, jangly opener “Doll”, the X-Files-utilized “Walking After You”, and “February Stars”, which features the album’s loudest whispers. Needless to say, The Colour and the Shape is chock-full of post-grunge goodies that come in big radio-ready packages – some of which would become Foo Fighters’ biggest hits. This is post-grunge at its finest.

P.S. The Michel Gondry-helmed “Everlong” MV is fucking surreal. It’s funny people always mention Inception, when “Everlong” is way way better – funnier and scarier too.