Death Sentence (2007)

Fatherly love and sibling rivalry

death-sentence-movie-posterStory-wise, Death Sentence (2007) is just your typical vigilante action movie. The son is murdered by gangsters at a gas station and the father goes after his son’s killers. If you’re expecting any new twist or new ingredients added to this basic story, then this might disappoint. But this isn’t just another vigilante action movie; James Wan’s detour from the horror genre is a potent action-drama. There’s an airtight thrilling chase in a populated business area and parking garage and the movie’s third act boasts a number of impressive, stylishly crafted action set pieces — even if the last sequence borrows heavily from Martin Scorsese’s Taxi Driver.

Before the heartbreaking hospital scene at the end of the first act (which had me bawling like child, by the way) is a modestly effective set-up usually uncommon for a film of this sort: a portrait of a happy family—husband, wife, two boys—that’s not without its own little imperfections (there’s a brewing sibling rivalry, the firstborn was the father’s favorite). You somehow expect in advance that their happiness and all this are not going to last. And since you have these likable characters, the bond between them, you also fear for them because you know what’s coming — because that’s how it works in this kind of movies. Someone’s gonna die and someone’s going to avenge their death.

And so the couple never saw their son again. He died on the night he revealed to his dad that he wanted to go to Canada and play Hockey for the rest of his life. Father and son were on their way home and just came from a Hockey game. And his mama never get to him before he died in the hospital. And while the song used in that scene — an emo-pop track from Pilot Speed called “Alright” — took me a bit out of the movie, I thought the scene was powerful enough to be ruined by it.

Death broke every one of them, the father, the mother, the younger brother. When the father learns that there’s a slim chance the killer would stay in jail (there were no other witnesses, no CCTV), he decided to drop the charge and take matters into his own hands.

There’s nothing really new about all this but the movie managed to convincingly portray the father’s descent into the level of the people who perpetrated his son’s murder. The movie shows how stupid his decisions are, how ill-equipped he is against a bunch of criminals and how the people he’s dealing with have really nothing to lose compared to him. It also shows that killing someone isn’t as easy as some movies would like to tell you; it takes its toll mentally, physically, psychologically.

What ultimately made the movie for me, is the part where the father tries to patch things up with his younger son, revealing that he expected him to be like his older brother. And that when the younger son turned out to be not like his firstborn, he was kind of disappointed. And so the younger son gets less attention.

While older movies like this (e.g., Death Wish) can be read as advocating vigilantism, if you look past the stylish and action-overdriven third act, this movie’s undercurrent is no other than the stupidity of it. And there’s one joke in the movie to clearly illustrate that. There is this one scene where, the protagonist, while in his office, talks about risk assessment (he works for an insurance company). For someone who has a lot to lose, it’s the one thing he totally forgets before going after his son’s killer.

Upstream Color (2013)

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I remember watching Shane Caruth’s first film Primer (2004) years ago. I fell asleep midway through it. Not that it was boring. It was just that my brain went on auto-shutdown after failing to follow the plot multiple times. If I remember correctly, I fast forwarded it to the end hoping I’d get some answers but I didn’t. Continue reading “Upstream Color (2013)”

On Rob Jara’s Tila (Monsoons)

tilaThe current pandemic, which keeps most of us indoors, gives a new shade of meaning to Rob Jara’s Tila (Monsoons). In real life, we are faced with a virus that’s killed hundreds of thousands all over the world and made us rethink our whole lives over. In the movie, Rob Jara locates his story (maybe) not in a distant future but in an alternate yet familiar present: a Philippines where it’s always raining, where our dry and wet seasons had been reduced to an unending rainy days with varying levels of rainfall throughout the year.

“The rainfall will be kept at Level 3 for the rest of August”, a PAGASA forecast announces on the radio. The sun never comes out, the archipelago always hidden under overcast and nimbus clouds. Like the current pandemic, this fucked-up climate also brought up a new normal: illegal vitamins, expensive bulalo soup, private flood control companies, and maybe, expensive umbrellas. The neverending rain lasted for years and years that there are people who were born without seeing the sun nor experience a sunny day.

Among those are the two main characters in the story: the flood control worker and the call center agent. In one scene, the guy looks up to the sky and asks a co-worker (who’s older than him) what was it like seeing the sun. In another, the call center agent chats with the security guard in the convenience store about how it was before and after the climate changed.

Framed as an unlikely love story, an impending romance after a meet-cute in a convenience store, the movie is also able translate some of our present problems into a (not really) futuristic setting. Like for instance, a college diploma hanging on the guy’s wall tells of underemployment. The company he’s working for is privately owned. Despite the high demand for flood control, there’s a mass layoff near the end of the film. Since it was made in 2014, the movie somehow, predicted a future where “endo” has not ended yet.

Ironically, the flood control worker lives in a house that’s perpetually flooded, sleeps in a bed that more or less doubles as flotation device which may or may not save him from drowning from rainwater while asleep. While call center jobs relatively pays more, there’s a scene where the girl has to work two shifts since her co-worker is going to take a vacation in another country. That her company offers travel packages to other countries “where it’s more fun and sunny” somehow mirrors the gloomy state or lack of job opportunities here as compared overseas.

With limited running time, Tila wasn’t really able to flesh out its will they or won’t they plot—if it’s really that it’s aiming for. But it was able to say a lot. Technically, you’d be impressed on how the filmmakers were able to achieved the movie’s constantly gloomy look. While watching the movie, I thought of how shooting the movie on rainy days must have been a logistic nightmare. It turns out, the rain was actually integrated digitally unto the frames.

The Magnificent Seven (2016)

Another unnecessary remake?

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Heard about this remake probably two years ago, then kind of forgot it exists. Never cared who’s in it, who’s behind it. Until two days ago, when I caught the movie’s final third. Or should I say, it caught me—off guard—as I found myself transported right in the middle of Rose Creek in the heat of the battle, running for cover Continue reading “The Magnificent Seven (2016)”

The Untamed (2016)

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Too much–of something is bad enough—says the Spice Girls hit song from the ’90s. It applies to a lot of things for sure—if not everything—including sex. Of which Alejandra gets very little, because her husband Angel, who’s also fucking her brother Fabian from behind her back, only knows how to please himself. Her husband’s actually gay, but he couldn’t come out of the closet because his Mama wouldn’t like it and his Papa would most probably disown him. Fabian is a caregiver in a hospital and it’s where he met and befriended Veronica, who would introduce him to the alien kept by an elderly couple in a cabin in the woods. And in case you don’t know, “cabin in the woods” spells horror in movies. Some says “the thing” in the cabin personifies the beast in each of us, our carnal desires. Too much love will kill you, said that song about Freddie Mercury. Too much sex will kill you too, or at least, at first only makes you feel numb. And if I’m making this sound like it’s a light hearted Mexican softcore movie, NO this is not light hearted at ALL. The Untamed (La Region Salvaje) is science fiction meditation on sex wrapped in understated domestic drama that has some really eerie disturbing scenes. I won’t recommend it unless you CAN stomach live action, hentai-like tentacle sex. And I won’t also recommend only if because that is your kind of thing (the movie’s a lot more than just fodder for one’s tentacle porn fetish). Though I’m not saying that one can’t watch the movie and “skip to the good parts” (trademark Mr. Skin). But why go through all the trouble, a clip of it is most definitely up elsewhere. You can try reddit. Or go directly to THE source—it’s most probably on Pornhub. They might even plant a tree if you watch it on repeat.

The Predator (2018)

Everybody Seems to Hate ‘The Predator’

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I’m not totally sure about this, but Shane Black being attached to write and direct The Predator probably created a lot of buzz. Fans probably had high hopes for a good sequel/soft reboot. Fox probably dreamt of a franchise (re)starter. Black has that Iron Man 3 magic in him. One controversy, a handful re-shoots, and studio wrangling later, all the buzz turned into negative hype. Continue reading “The Predator (2018)”

Tuhog (Larger Than Life) (2001)

148733-larger-than-life-0-230-0-345-cropThe ’90s brought us Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Eraserheads, Rivermaya, Backstreet Boys, Spice Girls, AND—Carlo J. Caparas movies. The last on that list is an embarrassment of riches: great acting, rape, murder, massacre, drug addicts, and Kris Aquino—all based on “true to life” stories. Couple that with sensationalist TV programs masquerading as public service, and you got surefire box office hits.

Add to that the softcore sex films of the mid ’90s to early ’00s and you get Tuhog (Larger Than Life, 2001), a drama-softcore-comedy film satire on filmmaking malpractice, starring Ina Raymundo and Klaudia Koronel, playing two versions of the same girl, who was raped by her grandfather. Hmm. That last sentence was long.

The film starts with filmmakers interviewing the victim and her mother (Irma Adlawan), who turned out to be a victim herself, propositioning an offer to turn their story into a movie. They were reluctant at first, but eventually gave in. When asked who she wanted to play her character on-screen, Floring (Raymundo) answered Judy Ann Santos. Well, she’s a fine actress. And this is the closest we’d ever see of Judy Ann Santos in an erotic film, playing a rape victim’s character in a movie within the movie. But the filmmakers and the producer, had another thing in mind. (The producer, by the way, agreed to produce the director’s pitch, with one condition, the movie should contain nudity and sex, lots of it.)

Instead of offering the role to Judy Ann, they gave it to Klaudia Koronel, whose previous movie credits include lurid titles such as Pisil, Kesong Puti, and Anakan Mo Ako. Nothing could prepare Floring and her mother for what’s to come. Though the title, Hayok Sa Laman (Lust For Flesh), should have been a dead giveaway. Coming to the city all the way from their hometown, just to see the finished film supposedly based on their lives, they walked out of it before the end credits roll. It’s an abomination—with great bad acting from both Jaclyn Jose and Dante Rivero, and shockingly nuanced and mostly nude performance from Klaudia Koronel.

That is, Hayok Sa Laman is what you’d get if Carlo J. Caparas and Wenn Deramas (RIP) had a child, who turns out to be a tianak (demon baby). This movie within the movie is so bad—you’d want to scrub yourself afterwards. If Pila Balde is sex comedy-Lino Brocka social drama hybrid, Tuhog is a cross  between a Mike de Leon satire and softcore drama comedy. Definitely one of the best films about films in the whole wheat multiverse.

Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)

The Best Spider-Man Movie?

SPIDER-MAN: ™ FAR FROM HOME

There’s probably a lot less at stake in Spider-Man: Far From Home than the last few MCU movies, but Spidey’s second solo MCU outing understands what most Marvel superhero movies don’t: that it takes a lot to beat a super-villain, physically, mentally, and emotionally. Continue reading “Spider-Man: Far From Home (2019)”

Pila Balde (1999) / Burlesk Queen Ngayon (1999)

pPila Balde (1999) is a soft core sex film about the people in a low-cost housing development and the neighboring squatter area. Those in the housing, relatively more affluent and gainly employed, takes what the slum dwellers delivers: water, laundry services, cheap labor, even sexual services. Those in the slums depends on their more affluent neighbors for employment. Imagine the new Bong Joon-ho film Parasite, but instead of the very rich Park family, you get people from the lower-middle class living in low-cost but decent housing. Instead of the Kims, you’ve got really poor people living in shanties. Written by Armando Lao and directed by Jeffrey Jeturian, Pila Balde is actually a social realist drama in the vein of Lino Brocka—but with heaps of comedy. And sex. Lots of sex—which, I think is forgivable. Or at least understandable. In a time when movies about social ills don’t sell like pancakes anymore but sex flicks does, can you blame the producers if they insist on having more of the latter? That is, Pila Bilda is like those Lino Brocka films set in the slums (there’s even squatter fire near the end of the movie) only it’s more than a bit twisted, mutated and eroticized. But it’s also less despairing.

 

t58491dlchrIn Burlesk Queen Ngayon (1999), Ina Raymundo plays a young single mother who works as stripper to raise her child. Not a remake of the Celso Ad. Castillo/Vilma Santos classic or anything. Sharing a title with the latter really does it less favor, drawing comparisons that makes it automatically the lesser of the two. And it is. And why it shouldn’t be? It’s a sex flick that cashed in on the then hot fad and Miss Sabado Nights’ popularity. Though it’s not blatantly campy, and treats its story with some sort of reverence not unlike in those serious, well-received Rosanna Roces movies like Ang Lalaki Sa Buhay Ni Selya and Babae sa Bintana. And it has a story to tell, no matter how well-worn or perfunctory. The worse one can say is that the story is just there to hang all the scenes with Ina Raymundo in varying state of undress. But that story isn’t nothing. And once you get past the phase of memorizing every naked this and that, that’s what remains—the story. At least that’s what I remember. That and Ina Raymundo coming out of a huge box cake, wearing only two-piece made of icing. Sweet.

Mission: Impossible 2 (2000)

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Some say this is the weakest entry in the Mission: Impossible series. And while these movies (unlike the TV show it’s based on) have always been more about Tom Cruise than about the team, M:I 2 probably focused more on Ethan Hunt—less on the team dynamics, less on teamwork—more than did the other movies. Continue reading “Mission: Impossible 2 (2000)”

Sutla (1999)

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I remember this movie was showing in cinemas for maybe a couple of days before the news came out that it was PULLED OUT—all of a sudden. (You can imagine the collectives oh’s and ah’s from members of the movie’s demographic who waited a little too long to go to the nearest theater.) It was banned, totally banned by the MTRCB aka the Enemy. Continue reading “Sutla (1999)”

The Killer 2: The Last Bullet (1996)

FD06AE4F752F3A5DD0E0737A4F422266A gun for hire (Ace Vergel) accidentally injured a bar singer (Aiko Melendez) during his last hit—gun powder blast to the eyes left her blind. A cop expert in taekwondo (Monsour del Rosario) and his buddy (Ruel Vernal) are in pursuit of the hitman, because he could lead them to the gun syndicate who ordered the killings. Well, I may or may not have made up that last part; I already forgot much of the plot and the baddies in the story. Gun dealers, drug dealers, in action movies, what’s the difference, anyways?

I probably saw this in theater in early 2000s. Initially thought this was made in the early aughts, when local action movies has only few remaining punches left in them. And I thought they made some surprising choices. One is casting Monsour del Rosario and Ace Vergel as the cop and the killer. Ace Vergel plays a sympathetic hitman while Monsour del Rosario, the straight-A cop. Two is in having no strong or vague love angle to the story. I mean, Ace Vergel and Aiko Melendez? Three, Ruel Vernal plays a good cop. And four, it’s a rip-off (remake? sequel?) of John Woo’s The Killer (1989), with Ace Vergel playing Chow Yun Fat’s character. (Turns out, this was released in 1996. And it’s actually listed on IMDB as an unofficial sequel to The Killer.)

Huling Sagupaan has the classic two man on the opposite side of the law—cop and hitman—teaming up to go against the bigger bad guys. The hitman just wanted the singer to see again, but when his middleman friend (Dan Fernandez) is killed by the syndicate, he finally turns on the guys who initially hired him. And he needs Monsour’s high kicks and hand to hand combat expertise for some heroic bloodshed. Plot-twist, they turned out to be childhood friends.

Again, it follows The Killer, story-wise, down to the part where a child caught in the crossfire is hit by a bullet and Ace Vergel’s character takes him to the hospital. But it still makes for a fun watch, as it echoes the playful gunfights in HK action films and the local martial arts movies from the ’90s directed by Philip Ko. Oh, wait, it was actually co-directed by Philip Ko.

Overlord (2018)

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What could be worse than both Nazis and zombies? Nazi zombies. Sentient, super-strong, Nazi zombies. Overlord does “WWII plus evil Nazi experiments” better than, say, Captain America: The First Avenger. It has memorable characters, bloodier, better action scenes, compellingly conflicted heroes, and a villain more evil and threatening than Hugo Weaving with red CGI face. And when you already have soldiers torn between following orders sticking to the plan and saving people while risking their mission, you don’t really need superpowers. But this movie has that too!—-superpowers. And for the better. Well, The First Avenger could have been more like this movie. If only Marvel movies have balls. Overlord is a perfect blend of 1940’s war era science fiction, horror, and superhero action heroics. And it’s quite funny, too. That soldier who wanted to write a book about the war—I laughed so hard when he goes pfft. And imagine the look on my face when one of the good guys lift himself up to get himself off the hook. And by “off the hook,” I mean literally. Pretty good movie.

Edge of Tomorrow (2014)

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On weekends, I sometimes just don’t feel like watching new movies or old films I haven’t seen before. So, I settle with movies I’ve already seen. Because they don’t require my full attention. Like if something comes up, like a phonecall, or work, or errands, I could easily switch it off. Luckily, nothing came up lately and I was able to re-watch a few movies without interruptions. One of them is Edge of Tomorrow, with Tom Cruise and Emily Blunt. Continue reading “Edge of Tomorrow (2014)”

Avengers: Endgame (2019)

Avengers: Endgame Is The Super Duper $@%!#& Season Finale of the Year

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The End Is The Beginning Is The End

Avengers: Endgame isn’t “the best MCU movie or the best superhero movie since (insert your preference here),” but it does what it has to do, “whatever it takes.” Even if that means Endgame makes for an unwieldy, ponderous, pandering, uneven, thrilling ride. It’s a crowd-pleaser and super duper entertaining. Continue reading “Avengers: Endgame (2019)”

The Avengers (2012)

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The Avengers (2012). The cataclysmic results of Loki’s entrance in a S.H.I.E.L.D. base was somewhat off-putting, sort of Michael Bay-like, but the movie regains my trust the moment Black Widow and Bruce Banner show up. At the start, Steve Rogers has nothing for Tony Stark but contempt, for Nick Fury and SHIELD, distrust. Continue reading “The Avengers (2012)”

Iron Man (2008), The Incredible Hulk (2008), Thor (2011)

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Iron-Man (2008). This is where it all begun, the Mark I of all Marvel movies. This is the movie where Marvel–after deciding to make their own movies based on characters they haven’t sold yet–finally hammers it home. In a cave. In Afghanistan. Tony Stark’s billionaire-genuis-playboy suits Robert Downey Jr. perfectly in the same the way the red and gold weaponized armor suit fits Tony Stark. Continue reading “Iron Man (2008), The Incredible Hulk (2008), Thor (2011)”

Banlieue 13 (2004)

Banlieue13.jpgSaw this once on pirate cable TV years ago. It’s nonstop French action with English subtitles. This was years before I learned about that wonderful art of jumping through windows and landing like Peter Parker. Parkour, it is called, probably a French word for something.

The actors are a bunch of unknowns (to me) but the action beats are familiar. The plot, there’s a nuke hijacked and lost in B13 (Banlieue as in Block or District?) and it’s up for a cop (played by a French Vin Diesel) and the Parkour guy to get to it first before the bad guys could activate it. Relentless fighting ensued–gunfights, knife-fights, Parkour, mixed martial arts, heck, even one gangster has to eat the Parkour guy’s sister’s panties at one point (no, not what you’re thinking–she probably wore it for three days tops). And Parkour guy’s sister used to do porn. (Yeah, I did my homework.)

But the fights were tight and refreshing (the first time around, most probably repetitive and exhausting on a second go). And there’s one big surprise in the end—which borrows the idea from the first cut off Dead KennedysFresh Fruits for Rotting Vegetables. Yeah, the chorus of which, goes “Kill, kill, kill, kill, kill the poor! Kill, kill, kill, kill, kill the poor!” The government was like “Let’s nuke ’em motherfuckers!” (Or do it like Duterte’s Drug War, if you have no nukes). Now, that’s something definitely worth fighting/dying/parkouring/whatever for.

Maria (2019)

Cristine Reyes goes for some good, old-fashioned revenge in ‘Maria’

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Seven years after that one final job, Maria (Cristine Reyes) now lives a quiet domestic life in an unnamed province. A nice big house, a loving husband, their cute little daughter, Cristine Reyes plays an ex-cartel assassin turned wife and mother, from killing people to cooking dinner.

Continue reading “Maria (2019)”

Training Day (2001)

Training Day: or How did your first day go?

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Holy s—Did I leave the stove on?

Training Day opens in early morn with LAPD officer Jake Hoyt preparing for his first day on a new assignment—he’s transferring to Rampart Division and will undergo evaluation under Detective Alonzo Harris, a bad-ass mofo cop played by Denzel Washington. After a meet-up in a cafe, the two drives around town as Alonzo shows Jake the ropes: Continue reading “Training Day (2001)”

Alita: Battle Angel (2019)

Battle Angel Kicks Ass (But There Probably Won’t Be A Sequel)

alitaLike Captain Marvel, at the center of Alita: Battle Angel is a strong female character who doesn’t know her past. In the movie, scientist Dr. Dyson Ido finds a disembodied female cyborg with fully functioning brain in a scrapyard, gives her a new body and names her after his deceased daughter. Then, Alita wakes up with no memory of her past and a whole new world to discover. Except this whole new world is a world of cyborgs, bounty hunters, cyborg criminals, scrap dealers and extreme sports called Motorball, and a place called Iron City—a wasteland sitting beneath the floating city of Zalem.

You know the girl meets cute boy and they fall in love kind of story. Alita is that kind of movie, only this time the girl is a cyborg and its set in post-apocalyptic future. Continue reading “Alita: Battle Angel (2019)”

Captain Marvel (2019)

‘Captain Marvel’ Is A ’90s Remix Of Superhero Origin Movie

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Skimmed a few reviews: some says it’s good, some says mediocre. Checked its Rotten Tomatoes score (“relatively high”) before I went in and kept in mind that Marvel movies tends to get overpraised (i.e., Doctor Strange, Black Panther, Civil War) most of the time. How did it go? It’s middling. Just another Marvel movie: bland-looking, snarky Continue reading “Captain Marvel (2019)”

Ant-Man & the Wasp (2018)

Bigger But Not Better Than ‘Ant-Man’

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The first Ant-Man, though admittedly a “small” movie, box-office-wise, is actually one of the less problematic movies in MCU’s Phase Two. Ant-Man benefited from the groundwork laid down by Edgar Wright and what dramatic and comedic bits were added later on by its eventual director Peyton Reed and the other writers. Of course there’s the strong performances by Paul Rudd and the rest of the cast. Continue reading “Ant-Man & the Wasp (2018)”

Aquaman (2018)

‘Aquaman’ Pulls Off Something Beautiful Out of DCEU’s Grim Dark Ass

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There’s a fair amount of cheese and a fair amount of fun to be had in Aquaman. Whether it’s characters shouting their silly names (Call me Ocean Master! I’m Black Manta!), or Jason Momoa seemingly just having fun almost the entire time, or director James Wan letting slip a few scenes where Amber Heard couldn’t even clearly say her lines, Aquaman is a movie that reminds the audience so often that “this is just a movie.” Continue reading “Aquaman (2018)”

Captain America Trilogy

How To Solve A Problem Like ‘Bucky’

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Captain America: The First Avenger (2011)

Wonder why I couldn’t like this movie more. It’s well made, has a unique look, the right amount of heart, and nice-looking set pieces and action scenes. Found it boring at first, gave it a second look and found Joe Johnston’s efforts, quite admirable, though still not a knock down punch. Maybe because it’s just so predictable. I already knew Cap’s only gonna end up frozen, he’s not gonna die. Continue reading “Captain America Trilogy”

The Hitman’s Bodyguard (2017)

Initially thought this is funnier than Deadpool 2. But that’s maybe because I’ve seen Deadpool 2 many times already. And then I saw this one. And it was refreshing that Ryan Reynolds isn’t the snarky one. That he’s being upstaged by and clearly no match to Mr. Nick Fury without the eyepatch. And Dios Mio! I never thought Salma Hayek would be the perfect match for the foul-mouthed Samuel L. Jackson.

Plot? Forget it. All I need is Sam Jackson in the passenger seat singing some blues while Mr. Pool answers with an Ace of Base tune and I’m in. No questions asked. Gary Oldman, made older with some thick make-up, as the Russian-therefore-he’s-bad dictator is the perfect baddie for bad-guy-is-good-guy Sam Jackson. Where have we seen that before? Probably from some forgettable action movie the title of which I can’t remember right now because the movie was, uhm, forgettable.

This movie is loaded with all the cliche an action movie fan could think of. It’s a little too long to waste 2 hours at the movies when it could have easily been just around ninety minutes. Though I never really checked my watch until near the third act. Which only means Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson (plus Salma Hayek) could be entertaining as fuck.

But still, two hours is a little too long when I could pretty much predict what’s going to happen or how it’s going to happen in the end. And that’s 242 words for a not so memorable movie. Make that 252. Wait, it’s 255 now. Two-fifty… Oh, I don’t how to end

Deadpool 2 Is The Super Duper $@%!#& Superhero Movie of the Year

13 Reasons Why Deadpool 2 Is The Super Duper $@%!#& Superhero Movie of the Year

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Not really a big comic book guy, but if you’d ask me who my favorite comic book characters are, top five would be, in no particular order: Spider-Man, Hulk, Punisher, Cable and Deadpool. That’s right, one from MCU’s Avengers team but not Iron Man, Thor or Cap and none from Fox’s X-Men. Wolverine? I like Wolverine, but not Hugh Jackman’s Polverine. Continue reading “Deadpool 2 Is The Super Duper $@%!#& Superhero Movie of the Year”

Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral (2018)

Everything Wrong With ‘Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral’

How Epic Was Goyo‘s Epic Fail?

TBA Productions and Jerrold Tarog reached a “new high” with Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral. It’s generally well recieved by both audience and critics. Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral is longer, bigger, slower, crispier, brighter, lighter than its predecessor—the flag-burning, blood boiling, gushing, fist-pumping, hatemongering, frothing at the mouth Heneral Luna. Is it better? Continue reading “Goyo: Ang Batang Heneral (2018)”